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Iranians for Human Rights and Democracy

"We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people." Martin Luther King,Jr.

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I am another Iranian striving for Human Rights and Democracy. read and sign the petition Please support the IRANIAN WOMENS' ONE MILLION SIGNATURES CAMPAIGNto change the discriminatory laws against women in Iran.

Sunday, April 23, 2006

Peaceful, Nonviolent Action

This is what I propose we do. We should make fliers that have the following statement:

"No war, no Islamic Republic. Referendum for Human Rights and Democracy in Iran Now."

We should post these fliers in Universities, downtowns of cities and public places
OUTSIDE OF IRAN. If you are inside Iran, well its obvious its very dangerous.
This way, our voices will be heard. We should do this to let the world know that Iranians don't want war and they don't want the current dictators either.

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مطلب را به بالاترین بفرستید: Balatarin

Friday, April 21, 2006

Poll Taken by Noqte.Com In Regards To Iranians Desire for the Islamic Republic of Iran

The following is a translation of a Poll taken this spring. I cannot vouch for
its accuracy, but I thought it was interesting. You can read the persian version here.

NOQTE.com


"Do you believe in the Islamic Republic or Iran?"

Response ,Number of votes, %

Yes, I believe in the Islamic ,167, 9.44
republic and I am active in
keeping it the way is is

yes but today's system differs ,135, 7.58
from the original ideals of the
revolution

yes but I believe in internal ,294, 16.52
reform

yes but I believe in changing ,156, 8.76
the system in completely

I am indifferent to this regime ,30, 1.69
or any other kind of regime

No, and I am waiting to see the ,69, 3.88
fate of the regime

No, but I put up with it due to ,64, 3.6
lack of options

No, I do not believe in the ideals ,631, 35.45
of the regime at all, but I see
no way of being able to create
change

No, I do not want the regime and ,211, 11.85
I am active towards regime change

NO answer ,22, 1.24

Total votes: 1170

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Wednesday, April 19, 2006

Please Email Your Vote or Comment: Would you support a Referendum held in Iran for Regime Change?

Please email me your vote to sheernejad@yahoo.com or comment below.

Would you support a national referendum in Iran prompting an exchange of the current Islamic regime for a democratic republic that places heavy emphasis on Human Rights and Freedom, and is a sovereign country not dependant upon the United States or the West.

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مطلب را به بالاترین بفرستید: Balatarin

Shirin Ebadi Writes a Memoir, Azadeh Moaveni co-authors




There are always rumors and accusations going on about Shirin Ebadi's motivations. She has written a book that is to be coming out of the press in a few weeks. I believe we ought to read her book before next time we give our opinions about her. This book was co-authored by Azadeh Moaveni.

Barnes and Nobles online

1 Comments:

Blogger Winston said...

she s a mullah apologist

2:50 AM  

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مطلب را به بالاترین بفرستید: Balatarin

Tuesday, April 18, 2006

Discussion with People in Iran about their Situation

I was communicating with a friend and he/she said that right now the situation in Iran is as if you smoosh all the people in Tehran in a compote can, and then start beating on it with a hammer.

My friend stated that Iranians could not get a good jobs, the Univerity entrance exam has been designed to be extremely difficult so that no one can get educated and try for a better life. People are either very rich or very poor, there is no middle class. He/she stated that people are hesitant do rise for a new government, in fear of a worse situation to come instead. He/she also indicated that all Iranians want to do is leave the country and imigrate somewhere else.

My response is that we should have the courage to fight for something better for our children, so that they can have a better future then our own. Additionally, there are fewer and fewer places to run to, after the fall of the twin towers in New York, middle easterners are less desirable. In the end, one can run only so much. We should fix the problem once and for all. After all, 50 years ago many countries were in bad shape. Germany was devestated after the war, and the U.S. still had segregation separating blacks from whites. Through their hard work they transformed their countries to the wonderful havens they are today.

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A Survivor Tells About Evin Prison Experience



I found an article about the experiences of a teenager that was imprisoned in Iran's Evin prison. She recounts her nightmare in the following article taken from The Iranian weblog.

and read more here

more Evin prison pictures

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Sunday, April 16, 2006

Iran to Give Palestenian Authority $50 million in Aid

Iran is giving the Palestenians $50 million dollers in aid.

Read here

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Thursday, April 13, 2006

DEMONSTRATION: Time for Iranians To Stand Up and Let Their Voice Be Heard

According to CSPAN radio, a poll was taken and 48% of Americans are in favor of a war with Iran. All the news media in America are buzzing about going to war with Iran, EXACTLY how they were buzzing before going to war with Afghanistan and Iraq. If Iran's regime was a government that respected Human Rights and Democracy, this would not be happening.

I want to plan a demonstration in Washington D.C. to send the message to the world that the current government of Iran is not representative of the Iranian people, and to advocate a United Nations observed referendum be held in Iran as to whether the people want the current regime or not. Ok, I admit it might hurt Iranian pride that the referendum would happen right before the threat of war, but why should we stand up for murderous criminal mullahs that we don't want anyway?

Some may argue that Nuclear Technology is Iran's right. I would agree that that is a fair statement for a civilized government, not Iran's fascist style dictatorship. Look at this from the world's point of view. First off, Ahmadinejad is considered mentally unstable thanks to his "Holocaust never happened" and "Isreal should be wiped of the face of the earth" platform. Second, the world sees how brutal the Iranian government is to its own people. Don't you think that when they see this, that they'll think that if the Iranian government will torture and murder its own people to the extent that it is, then how bad is the Iranian government going to abuse outsiders who are not one of their own with their new nuclear torture toy? Even American and Israeli governments who have nuclear weapons, love and protect their own people, the Iranian government does not!

Please send me your thoughts in this regard. Now more than ever, your voice matters.

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Thursday, April 06, 2006

Akbar Ganji Ordered to Return to Prison, Ganji Resists

It seems that the Islamic Republic of Iran has ordered Ganji back to prison, and Ganji is resisting.

and read more here

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Rebuttal From Akbar Atri In Regards to His Position on War With Iran

Iranian Students are Grateful for Harvard Support

Before Harvard’s Spring Break, Alireza Doostdar and Maryam Gharavi wrote an editorial against the Iran Freedom Concert and against my speech at the concert. In the article they questioned my commitment to the Iranian people, suggested that public discussion of human rights in Iran means supporting a US war against Iran, and accused concert organizers of promoting a pro-war agenda.

I am a human rights activist who has been involved in the democratic student movement in Iran for the last decade. In 1996, I was elected, by Iranian students, to the student movement’s central committee known as Daftar Tahkim Vahdat, which is the largest organization for reform and democracy in Iran. From 1998 to 2005, I chaired the organization’s human rights committee.

In Iran, being an outspoken student activist means you have to pay a price – much worse than an angry editorial. Because of my activities, I have been arrested, beaten, and tortured on several occasions. Last year, I was convicted for criticizing Iran’s “Supreme Leader” – Ayatollah Ali Khamenei – and was sentenced to seven years in prison. I know too well how student reform movements in Iran have been struggling to obtain the most basic of human rights for all Iranians.

Since 1979, the Islamic Republic of Iran has been governed by a repressive religious code and ruled by an untouchable “Supreme Leader.” Men and women lack equal rights, and religious minorities face persecution. The “Supreme Leader” cannot be held accountable to any person or any organization. It is a criminal offense to criticize Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and many who have done so – like Daryoush Forohar, Majeid Sharif, and many others – have been tortured and killed by the regime. Any friend of the Iranian people cannot in good conscience muzzle discussion of human rights as the regime silences and murders dissidents.

Students at Harvard have at last ended their silence on the repression Iranian students face. The Iran Freedom Concert was arranged by students who believe that such undertakings create a better relationship between Iranian and American students. This may be the first time American students have mobilized on campus to support our cause.

Unlike most other dictatorships, Iran has a strong student movement that opposes the regime. Although it is very dangerous, we criticize the government, we hold protests in the streets, and we publish articles and blogs demanding change. Many students have been assaulted, but we continue our struggle and hope that the international community will not abandon us.

At a time when Iranian students feel isolated and vulnerable, it is important for concerned students here to reach out and let Iranians know that they are not alone. I have received many emails of support from friends who want to work with American students. One of my colleagues even hopes to hold an Iran Freedom Concert in Tehran – one day.

It may be difficult for American students to understand the environment Iranians live in. If we tried to do such a concert in Tehran today, the basij (religious militia) would likely storm the event, beat female performers, and arrest the student organizers.

My greatest goal in life is to see a free Iran in which the most basic human rights of all genders and minorities are respected and protected. While I do support the idea of a change in the regime I hope it will come internally, through a free election monitored by the UN, as I have said at many talks in many places.

I would like to point out that I never supported war in Iran. Although I am against regimes like the Taliban in Afghanistan and the Ba’ath Party in Iraq, saying this does not make me a warmonger. And simply opposing war does not make one a supporter of human rights – just look at the anti-war stand of the regimes in China and Russia.

After the September 11th terror attacks, thousands of Iranian students held vigils in solidarity with the American people and against religious terrorism. We wanted to reach out to Americans in a time when you were suffering. Now Harvard students of so many different backgrounds have stepped forward for us.

Today, all Iranians and friends of the Iranian people need to help each other in the struggle for genuine democracy and human rights in Iran.

Akbar Atri, who spoke at the Iran Freedom Concert in Leverett House on March 18th, is a former member of the executive committee of Tahkim Vahdat in Iran.

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Saturday, April 01, 2006

Interview with Man Opposing Akbar Atri (Part III)


Since I am not a professional journalist, I have paraphrased the words of the individuals I am interviewing. These were interviews that were conducted at the Iranian Freedom Concert held at Harvard University.

After my interview with Akbar Atri (posted previously), I went to speak with the Iranian man that was loudly dissenting during Akbar Atri’s speech. I asked him if he could elaborate as to why he was holding a protest sign. He asked which newspaper I was working for. I replied that I was writing for my blog.

Question 1
SI: Are you from the Muslim Student Association?
Man (paraphrased): No I am representing the “Association for Justice for the Middle East”.

Question 2
SI: Could you explain why you are holding that sign? (the sign had something along the lines of “No War for Iran” written on it).

Man (paraphrased): I don’t want war for Iran. I dislike people like Akbar Atri that went to the U.S. congress with Afshari and asked for aid to reform Iran. They appoint themselves as ambassadors of Iran and speak for the rest of the Iranians. I don’t remember being asked if I wanted U.S aid towards reform in Iran.

Question 3

SI: Are you for reform in Iran, not believing Iran needs reform……?

Man (paraphrased): I believe that Iran should have some reform, but the Iranian people can decide for themselves. Akbar Atri, he did some demonstrations, but I don’t think he even went to jail. Ok, Afshari went to jail for a while, but not Atri. Atri has his own agenda; he wants to be the Iranian Ahmad Chalebi. He is a traitor and he is weak.

Question 4

SI: But the people in Iran are trying for change and the hardliners in Iran prevent them from achieving it. Should they not seek help from other countries? Is your problem with Atri because he went to the U.S. instead of the United Nations?

Man (paraphrased): I believe people should hold the U.S. accountable for giving money to the real terrorists like Israel and Egypt, and the crimes the U.S. has committed against humanity by supporting Saddam previously, and overthrowing Mossadegh.

Question 5
SI: It seems that you believe in reform and human rights also, do you not believe that the reformists should have more dialogue? Part of the reason why no movement in Iran can take shape is because no on can agree on anything, so we never get anywhere?

Man (paraphrased): I think the reformers can talk amongst themselves

Question 6
SI: Why don’t you go and talk to Akbar Atri?
Man (paraphrased): I think its best that I leave because I am really angry right now.

End of interview.

A commentary will be coming soon in regards to the interviewer’s reflections of Akbar Atri and the Opposing man’s interview.

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مطلب را به بالاترین بفرستید: Balatarin